Peripheral Vision and the power of its blessings

Neurologists are studying the differences between stimuli from peripheral and central visions in the context of the bigger question "How does the brain respond to environmental stimuli which are not perceived consciously but which lead to moduled human behavior?". The brain, for example, is able to trigger certain changes in the nervous system in response to facial expressions even when a person's attention is not fully there. Unconsciously perceived fear in peripheral vision alerts the brain faster than fear presented in the central vision according to researchers at the university of Lyon, France. There must be something more to the vision from the corner of the eye than what we know now.


Poets who wrote devotional text from centuries ago acknowledged the power of the corner of the eye glance. Siddhars texts say that the divine mother showers her blessings through her corner of the eye glace. There is a special term for the sidelong look. It is called Kadaikann (கடைக்கண்) in Tamil. It equivalent term in Sanskrit is Kataakshaa (कटाक्ष). When we study the formation of this term, we can not but wonder if these poets were aware of neurological nuances of brain which relate to vision.

The word Kataaksha is a combination of Kata (to go) and Aksha (eye). This seems like a non-sensical combination. But is it? Physicians say that the loss of peripheral vision leads to "tunnel vision". A person experiencing tunnel vision loses the ability to sense motion and can not walk without crashing into things. The poets who coined the word "Kataaksha" must have sensed the close connection between peripheral vision and mobility (to go). Anyone who has read devotional poems immediately interprets the word "Kataaksha" as blessings. According to Siddhars, a liberated being sees the world as a part of his own self and as a reflection in his own heart. Everyhing maybe a perpheral vision stimuli to the brain in an altered state of consciousness. Scientists have a lot more to study about the meditative state of the brain.

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