Dharma Archetypes and Consumerism



Simon Chokoisky's analyzes fulfillment seeking humans in life in his recent book "The 5 Dharma Types". The archetype model in his book provides a nice platform for understanding a fix for the the global society which is increasingly propelled by consumerism. The easiest to spot archetype in a today's society is what Simon called as the "Outsider". The disillusioned whose numbers are swelling and whose grudging attitude is draining their own energies is the "outsider" archetype in today;s world.

Consumerism wins when a majority of society's members are consuming with a gusto. A Consumer who is raising no sustainability questions and who is poorly guided of alternate options fits perfectly the archetype of "laborer" in Simon's book. A consumer cares for comforts in life and does not want to shoulder direct responsibility for environmental havoc and the future direction of the society.  Dharma based societies in the past grouped anyone not willing to take a bigger responsibility under the laborer archetype. In a consumer society the merchant archetype holds the reins of the society. Media and financial systems of the society are their playground. The educator and the warrior archetype should in reality be in charge of the media and politics respectively but are found confused and without power in a consumer based society.

Latest DNA pool studies indicate that the advent of rigid divisions in Indian society happened 2000 years ago

According to Simon if each of these archetypes find their respective life purpose or "Dharma" they will begin to feel more full filled with their lives. The irony is that the warrior archetype can only find fulfillment when setting the agenda for discipline in society, a educator archetype when holding the vision of interdependent existence, a merchant archetype when being generous as well as greedy, and laborer archetypes when using the head as much as the heart. Can a society remain a consumer society if everyone found what they are missing? According ancient wisdom, a small percentage of people finding their Dharma and becoming role models is sufficient to flood the society with more happiness and fulfillment.