Genesis on Earth - Rudra influence

Reporting in the journal Nature Geoscience, a team of scientists brought a new clue to the puzzle of how life formed on planet Earth 4 billion years ago. Amino acids are the basic building blocks of protein and other longer chain molecules seen in life forms. The team's experiment adds yet another explanation for how amino acids arrived on the planet. Molecules supporting life arriving on a comet from an alien region had been the popular theory before the results from the new research became available. These new experiments add credence to the possibility of genesis being earth based. They establish the idea of the formation of amino acids from simpler molecules such as water, carbon dioxide ice and others which were available in the nascent solar system.

Intending to study the impact of comets on the atmosphere of a young earth, the team fired projectiles through a high speed gun into a chamber containing a mix of air molecules resembling Earth's atmosphere billions of years ago. Shock waves generated in the air chamber by the high speed projectile indeed caused amino acids to form. Comets moving at 7-8 Kilometer per second create shock waves along their path. Shock waves create intense heat enabling simpler molecules to combine. Scientists are still trying to understand how amino acids combine to create protein molecules. Rishis in deep meditation also analyzed the creation process.

Any turbulence that causes beneficial results is a manifestation of Rudra impulse according to Vedic sciences. Rudra is closely associated with Agni (heat). Rudra manifests brand new forms by transforming existing ones. Rudra's anthropomorphic image holds in one hand a bow whose twang creates a powerful shock wave. The shock wave is destructive or conducive based on one's view point. Rudra being a Devata, his field of influence extends from the smallest to the largest in the universe. Rishis have even identified a region of the sky where Rudra's influence dominates (Read more in the book Ancient Skies and Astronomy Now).